Lego therapy and Autistic Spectrum development

Group children boys and girls game blocks on floor in preschool.

1 in every 100 people in the UK is on the autistic spectrum. The autistic spectrum describes a range of conditions that effect interaction, communication, interests and behaviour, including Asperger syndrome and childhood autism.

We asked Susan Fletcher, lead facilitator at ASC Inclusion, Speke, regarding her experience with children on the Autistic Spectrum and LEGO therapy.

“As a parent of an ‘Aspie’ child, I understand the daily challenges shared by all parents, but also the experience of having a child on the autistic spectrum.   It was whilst on my own journey I realised the shortfall in social skill intervention programmes. After a number of years researching the interventions available I discovered LEGO Therapy, which is the brain child of Dr Dan LeGoff, a child psychologist.”

Lego based therapy is a skill building approach which has been recognised as an effective social skills development method.  Evidence is based on research conducted by Clinical Psychologists both in Cambridge University and Yale University.

LEGO Therapy focuses on problem solving, sharing, listening and conversation. Children are grouped by age and ability, and then they work together on a joint task. This provides the autistic learners with specific skills and techniques, such as active listening, use of names when speaking and allowing time for other members to respond.

The aim is that social skills therapy will provide people on the autism spectrum with the ability to converse, share, play and work with typical peers. In an ideal world, such therapy will allow people on the autism spectrum to become almost indistinguishable from their typical peers. Furthermore, through the social contact initiated by these children, there is a significant increase in appropriate behaviour and sustained interaction which generalises to the classroom and playground.

For more information regarding LEGO therapy for children within the autistic spectrum visit: www.asc-inclusion.org or call: 0151 792 6530

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